Licence 2

Ouvrages au programme des Licence 2 LLCER Anglais pour l'année scolaire 2020-2021

  • Emma is considered by many to be Austen's finest and most representative novel. The story of Emma Woodhouse's matchmaking, and her awakening to the true feelings of others as well as herself, is told with consummate wit and humour. This new edition contains lively notes and an introduction that explores how Austen transmutes the everyday into the revelatory.

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  • Arden Twelfth Night

    Critically acclaimed as one of Shakespeare's most complex and intriguing plays, "Twelfth Night" is a classic romantic comedy of mistaken identities. This book explores the factors that make up the play's textual, theatrical, critical and cultural history. It surveys the play's production and reception and emphasizes the role of the spectator.

  • Le nouveau Bled attendu par les lycéens, les étudiants et les adultes pour avoir enfin le mot juste en toutes circonstances.


    - Plus de 15 000 mots classés par thèmes (une centaine), sur tous les grands domaines de l'activité et de la pensée humaines, de la géographie et du monde vivant, ainsi qu'un panorama des grands repères culturels du monde anglophone.
    - Chaque thème présenté par double page de manière très claire avec de nombreux exemples d'utilisation des mots en contexte, les pièges à éviter, la phonétique, les expressions idiomatiques liées au thème et des exercices systématiques de réemploi du vocabulaire.
    - Des doubles pages de civilisation des principaux pays anglophones (modes de vie, société, institutions, politique, anecdotes, etc.) - Tous les corrigés, un tableau des verbes irréguliers, un index thématique.

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  • Life after life

    Kate Atkinson

    WINNER OF THE COSTA NOVEL AWARD What if you had the chance to live your life again and again, until you finally got it right?



    During a snowstorm in England in 1910, a baby is born and dies before she can take her first breath.



    During a snowstorm in England in 1910, the same baby is born and lives to tell the tale.



    What if there were second chances? And third chances? In fact an infinite number of chances to live your life? Would you eventually be able to save the world from its own inevitable destiny? And would you even want to?



    Life After Life follows Ursula Todd as she lives through the turbulent events of the last century again and again. With wit and compassion, Kate Atkinson finds warmth even in life's bleakest moments, and shows an extraordinary ability to evoke the past. Here she is at her most profound and inventive, in a novel that celebrates the best and worst of ourselves.

  • MIDDLE ENGLAND

    Jonathan Coe

    • Penguin
    • 27 June 2019

    'THE BOOK EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT' THE TIMES 'It was tempting to think, at times like this, that some bizarre hysteria had gripped the British people' Beginning eight years ago on the outskirts of Birmingham, where car factories have been replaced by Poundland, and London, where frenzied riots give way to Olympic fever, Middle England follows a brilliantly vivid cast of characters through a time of immense change. There are newlyweds Ian and Sophie, who disagree about the future of the country and, possibly, the future of their relationship; Doug, the political commentator who writes impassioned columns about austerity from his Chelsea townhouse, and his radical teenage daughter who will stop at nothing in her quest for social justice; Benjamin Trotter, who embarks on an apparently doomed new career in middle age, and his father Colin, whose last wish is to vote in the European referendum. And within all these lives is the story of modern England: a story of nostalgia and delusion; of bewilderment and barely-suppressed rage. Following in the footsteps of The Rotters' Club and The Closed Circle , Jonathan Coe's new novel is the novel for our strange new times. 'From post-industrial Birmingham to the London riots and the current political gridlock, [ Middle England ] takes in family, literature and love in a comedy for our times' Guardian 'Coe shows an understanding of this country that goes beyond what most cabinet ministers can muster . . . his light, funny writing makes you feel better' Evening Standard ' Middle England is a full-blooded state of the nation novel, and it brings us bang up-to-date' Sunday Times Coe is an extraordinarily deft plotter...the book zips along...he tackles big ambitious themes, in this case the effect of politics on people's lives, and political opinions on personal relations' Mail on Sunday 'Sublimely good. Funny, tender, human and intelligent ... the state of the (Brexit) nation novel to end them all. Jonathan Coe's best since What a Carve Up! ' India Knight ' An astute, enlightened and enlightening journey into the heart of our current national identity crisis. Both moving and funny. As we'd expect from Coe' Ben Elton 'The first great Brexit novel' Sathnam Sanghera 'Let me add to the chorus of praise for Jonathan Coe's new book Middle England . Easily my favourite of his since What a Carve Up!, which did for Thatcherism what Middle England does for Brexit' John Crace 'Brilliant. Read it too fast, finished it too soon' Nigella Lawson 'Coe's comic critique of a divided country dazzles . . . Properly laugh-out-loud funny . . . it is also incisive and brilliant about our divided country and the deep chasms revealed by the vote to leave. Do not miss' The Bookseller 'A copper bottomed masterpiece' Barney Norris

  • Winner of the Whitbread Book of the Year 'Outstanding...a stunningly good read' Observer 'Mark Haddon's portrayal of an emotionally dissociated mind is a superb achievement... Wise and bleakly funny' Ian McEwan The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is a murder mystery novel like no other. The detective, and narrator, is Christopher Boone. Christopher is fifteen and has Asperger's Syndrome. He knows a very great deal about maths and very little about human beings. He loves lists, patterns and the truth. He hates the colours yellow and brown and being touched. He has never gone further than the end of the road on his own, but when he finds a neighbour's dog murdered he sets out on a terrifying journey which will turn his whole world upside down.

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  • In the summer of 1956, Stevens, the ageing butler of Darlington Hall, embarks on a leisurely holiday that will take him deep into the countryside and into his past.

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  • An impassioned, intense, haunting family drama - a stunning imagining of a life stolen, and reclaimed

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  • SPRING

    Ali Smith

    • Penguin
    • 14 March 2020

    From the bestselling author of Autumn and Winter , as well as the Baileys Prize-winning How to be both , comes the next installment in the remarkable, once-in-a-generation masterpiece, the Seasonal Quartet What unites Katherine Mansfield, Charlie Chaplin, Shakespeare, Rilke, Beethoven, Brexit, the present, the past, the north, the south, the east, the west, a man mourning lost times, a woman trapped in modern times? Spring. The great connective. With an eye to the migrancy of story over time, and riffing on Pericles, one of Shakespeare's most resistant and rollicking works, Ali Smith tells the impossible tale of an impossible time. In a time of walls and lockdown Smith opens the door. The time we're living in is changing nature. Will it change the nature of story? Hope springs eternal. Praise for the Seasonal Quartet: 'Transcendental writing about art, death, political lies, and all the dimensions of love . It's a case not so much of reading between the lines as of being blinded by the light between the lines - in a good way' Deborah Levy on Autumn 'The novel of the year is obviously Autumn , which managed the miracle of making at least a kind of sense out of post-Brexit Britain' Olivia Laing, Observer on Autumn 'Ali Smith is flat-out brilliant, and she's on fire these days... Combining brainy playfulness with depth, topicality with timelessness, and complexity with accessibility while delivering an impassioned defence of human decency and art' NPR on Winter 'Rank[s] among the most original, consoling and inspiring of the artistic responses to 'this mad and bitter mess' of the present' Financial Times on Winter 'A novel of great ferocity, tenderness and generosity of spirit that you feel Dickens would have recognised... Smith is engaged in an extended process of mythologizing the present states of Britain... Luminously beautiful' Observer on Winter

  • White teeth

    Zadie Smith

    Zadie Smith';s dazzling debut caught critics grasping for comparisons and deciding on everyone from Charles Dickens to Salman Rushdie to John Irving and Martin Amis. But the truth is that Zadie Smith';s voice is remarkably, fluently, and altogether wonderfully her own.At the center of this invigorating novel are two unlikely friends, Archie Jones and Samad Iqbal. Hapless veterans of World War II, Archie and Samad and their families become agents of England';s irrevocable transformation. A second marriage to Clara Bowden, a beautiful, albeit tooth-challenged, Jamaican half his age, quite literally gives Archie a second lease on life, and produces Irie, a knowing child whose personality doesn';t quite match her name (Jamaican for "no problem"). Samad';s late-in-life arranged marriage (he had to wait for his bride to be born), produces twin sons whose separate paths confound Iqbal';s every effort to direct them, and a renewed, if selective, submission to his Islamic faith. Set against London';s racial and cultural tapestry, venturing across the former empire and into the past as it barrels toward the future, White Teeth revels in the ecstatic hodgepodge of modern life, flirting with disaster, confounding expectations, and embracing the comedy of daily existence.From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • A Streetcar Named Desire shows a turbulent confrontation between traditional values in the American South - an old-world graciousness and beauty running decoratively to seed - set against the rough-edged, aggressive materialism of the new world. Through the vividly characterised figures of Southern belle Blanche Dubois, seeking refuge from physical ugliness in decayed gentility, and her brutal brother-in-law Stanley Kowalski, Tennessee Williams dramatises his sense of the South's past as still active and often destructive in modern America.

    This revised edition features a new production history of the play that considers both stage and screen presentations, an updated bibliography and extensive notes on the language of the play.

    Commentary and notes by Patricia Hern and Michael Hooper.

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